Clinical question comments:What actions should be performed post-administration of cancer therapy to maximise safety?/Evidence Summary

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Contents

Thread titleRepliesLast modified
What actions should be performed post-administration of cancer therapy to maximise safety?012:49, 15 June 2017

What actions should be performed post-administration of cancer therapy to maximise safety?

Patients being discharged home require information on treatment that has been administered and actions to be taken in the case of a severe event or feeling unwell. Providing the name and phone number of a healthcare professional as a 24 hour contact for advice and emergencies (e.g. on-call practitioner, emergency department) minimises delays in the assessment of side-effects from treatment.

Enhancing the patient feedback look here is important. It is difficult for patients and carers to triage the adverse effects themselves and education is vital, as is the establishment of 24 hour contact plans.

In my experience, this is not checked and well documented or discussed with patients and carers.

If a nurse coordinator system is available, this proves invaluable but in many settings of cancer care, this is not available. After hours medical cover is often inexperienced, patchy, difficult to access with nurse triage systems widespread now. This leaves many patients exposed to difficulties after hours, especially in rural and remote areas.

Again, patient and carer education and involvement as key partners requiring status of partners in care, is vital and should be a stronger statement in this document dealing with safe delivery of chemotherapy.

I appreciate the references in the wiki document that allude to the patient experience and the behaviours which influence patient/carer engagement and reporting of adverse events (Schwappach and Wernli) and think this work on behavioural models is important and needs to be increased, both in clinical research work, and in this document.

Assoc Prof Odette Spruyt (talk)12:49, 15 June 2017